Casatiello and a Nest

by Michelle on June 9, 2009

From Italian Baking Secrets; This spicy bread flicked with chunks of salami and freshly ground pepper, was usually made for Easter in the countryside of Naples, but it is now eaten year-round except during the steamy months of summer. The traditional Casatiello was a peppery rustic bread, shaped like a large doughnut and with eggs still in the shell held in place on top with two crossed hands of dough.

Casatiello3

Do you remember Home Economics? When I was in Middle School we had to take Home Economics and I hated it. My Mom sewed everything I wore so sewing was nothing new for me. And knitting, well I made my first sweater when I was 10 years old, so really did not need any help in that department either. And as for cooking, it was better then sewing but not by much. The very first thing I ever made in Home Economics was Eggs in a Nest and I specifically remember this dish because it was about the only thing we made that year that I liked.

Casatiello9

The Casateillo Bread was an easy bread to make and I loaded it with salami and Provolone cheese, at least a cup of each. The bread baked beautifully but I thought it would be a real powerhouse of flavor and it was rather subtle. But as soon as I tasted it, I thought of that long ago, silly Home Economics class and Eggs in a Nest. It’s always so funny how flavors stir memories and the memories are so crystal clear.

eggnest1

Eggs in a Nest
Recipe from my memories of a long ago Home Economics Class

1 whole piece of soft bread
1 egg
1 TBL EVOO
1 tsp butter
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Cut a circle out of the middle of a piece of bread, careful to leave at least 1/2″ border. I used a 2″ cookie cutter to cut the hole.

Heat EVOO in a fry pan over medium heat. Add the butter. When the butter is melted, place the piece of bread in the pan. Crack an egg into a small bowl and gently slide the egg into the hole of the bread. When the white is semi cooked, flip the bread over to grill the other side. Salt and pepper. DELICIOUS!

The following video is from the movie Moonstruck. It is the breakfast scene with Cher and Olympia Dukakis. Olympia Dukakis is making Eggs in a Nest.

Google Books has the entire book, “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread”, by Peter Reinhart, scanned and you can find the recipe on Page 128 by clicking here.

All Rights Reserved 2008-9 © Big Black Dog

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Comments

  • Kayte June 9, 2009 at 2:05 am

    That bread looks fantastic. All those bits so evenly spread throughout that dough…what a pro. Eggs in a nest…we always called those campfire eggs as we made them when we went camping…fond memories. Thanks for sharing, fun post to learn all these things.

  • Nancy/n.o.e June 9, 2009 at 2:21 am

    Beautiful loaf, Michelle, and I love how you made the eggs in a hole with it. Taste memories are so strong, aren’t they?

  • Di June 9, 2009 at 2:47 am

    Wow. My husband would absolutely love that–salami, provolone, fried eggs… lots of his favorites. =) And your loaves look wonderful. I’m still trying to decide what meat and cheese to put in mine.

  • susies1955 June 9, 2009 at 8:40 am

    Beautiful loaves. You did great.
    :)
    Susie

  • Amanda June 9, 2009 at 11:43 am

    Oh yes I remember home ec and I also remember eggs in a nest! Your bread loaves look gorgeous!

  • Kat June 9, 2009 at 1:19 pm

    It all sounds so delicious! I love that movie, one of my favorites. Great job on the bread.

  • YankeeQuilter June 9, 2009 at 2:10 pm

    That bread looks wonderful. My Dad was a principal down the North End in Boston which was primarily Italian. He used to bring home breads like this…maybe it is time to try a new recipe….

  • amuse me June 9, 2009 at 3:39 pm

    I think I just figured out what to have for lunch — an egg in a nest. Thanks for reminding me of this awesome bit of comfort food. :) M

  • California Girl June 9, 2009 at 6:43 pm

    1) My first Home Ec recipe was an English muffin pizza. I think it was a toasted muffin half spread with pizza sauce, mozzarella & baked. As a result, I did not get into food for another twenty years!

    2) I never heard of Eggs in a Nest til I met my husband in h.s. His mother made them for him when he was little.

    3) Love the video from “Moonstruck”. I wouldn’t have remembered she was making the recipe but great inclusion. Always loved the part where the mother asks her daughter,

    “Do you love him, Loretta?”

    “Oh, I love him awful, Ma.”

    “Oh, that’s too bad.”

    Possible paraphrasing but close enough.

  • Cindy June 9, 2009 at 7:08 pm

    My home ec memories are painful. I would sew a seam and the teacher would make me rip it out and do it again because it wasn’t straight enough. My first project was red velvet hot pants!! Thanks for bringing up such a deeply burried memory.

    Your bread looks yummy. So do the eggs in a nest. I just may make them for dinner tonight.

  • Natashya KitchenPuppies June 9, 2009 at 7:21 pm

    Moonstruck is one of my favourite movies.
    I do the grampa part for the dogs.
    “Why, why do you make me wait?”
    “It’s la bella luna. Aauuoooooo!”

    Your bread is beautiful!

  • Pete Eatemall June 9, 2009 at 7:41 pm

    Your loaves look scrumptious and perfect…They smell was this bread was great…filled the whole apartment…We looked eggs in a nest as kids..good memories…thanks for sharing!!
    Happy Baking!

  • noe June 9, 2009 at 10:59 pm

    we call those eggies in a basket–so good!!! your bread looks awesome!

  • Marta June 10, 2009 at 9:02 pm

    hahaha beautiful recipe rescued from home ec class! I actually have two recipes from those classes that I still use to this day!
    Good call on the provolone, looks delicious!

  • get in here comics June 10, 2009 at 11:13 pm

    That bread made my mouth water… off to the kitchen.

  • Eggs Benedict Salad with Casatiello Torpedoes February 15, 2011 at 12:04 am

    […] first made Casatiello Bread several years ago when I was baking my way through the book “Bread Baker’s […]

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