Jelly Belly Lollipops!

by Michelle on April 11, 2011

I made some Valentine’s Day Lollipops and my nieces loved them. So I decided to make some more lollipops for Easter and instead of flavoring the syrup, I decorated them with Jelly Belly jelly beans, white chocolate, confections and coconut. And they turned out so pretty!

I’m starting to become quite comfortable working with candy syrup and I’m beginning to experiment a bit. This time I decided to try pouring some lollipop molds before the syrup reached the hard crack point of 300 degrees. When the temperature reached about 275 degree I removed enough for 2 lollipops and poured the molds. And it took a bit longer to set up but the lollipops hardened and popped right out the mold just fine. So for the second batch, I used a different thermometer just to make sure the temperature was accurate and again I started pouring the molds at 275 degrees and once again the lollipops turned out perfectly.

Candy Making Essentials:

Heavy pot
Wooden Spoon
Candy Thermometer
Mold(s)
Parchment Paper
Flavoring
Food Coloring

Considerations:

You will need a candy thermometer as you must bring the syrup up to a temperature of 300 degrees or hard crack point. If you do not reach the hard crack point your candy will not set and if the temperature rises above hard crack the syrup will burn.

Bringing the syrup to the Hard Crack Point is the most difficult thing about making candy. DO NOT leave your kitchen when the candy is on the burner. DO NOT answer the phone. DO NOT clean out your kitchen junk drawer. You must keep your eye on the hot syrup and the thermometer.

NOTE: With this batch of candy I did experiment a bit and found that I could heat the candy syrup to about 275 degrees and then start pouring the syrup into the molds. The syrup will still set up but it does take a little longer to completely harden. But since candy syrup burns quickly after reaching hard crack which is 300 degrees, removing the candy sooner is much less stressful and gave me more time to color and pour the candy.

HARD CANDY RECIPE

2 cups sugar
2/3 cups light corn syrup
3/4 cups water
1 tsp flavoring, if you’re using flavoring
Food coloring

Options: Chocolate, Candy and Confections for decorating (I use Almond Bark for White Chocolate)

Lightly spray the mold(s) with Pam and wipe out any extra oil with a paper towel.

Mix the sugar, water and corn syrup in a heavy pot. Bring to a boil and then turn down the heat to just a hard simmer. Watch the thermometer carefully. It is important that once the syrup is warm to NOT stir it. When the thermometer reaches 300 degrees/hard crack, remove the pan from the heat and add the color and flavoring.

While the syrup is heating, place a piece of parchment paper on a cutting board. Place the candy molds on the parchment paper. It is easier to transport the molds if they are on a cutting board and the parchment paper will catch any spills.

You must work quickly now as the syrup will start setting up as soon as you remove it from the heat. I used a small ladle to transport the syrup and fill the molds and it worked out very well.

As soon as the candy starts setting up, insert the lollipop stick. The stick may move a bit, but just hold it in place for a minute or so. Or you can find a place to prop up the stick until the candy sets. I set the mold next to a big crock I have and it holds the stick steady until the candy has cooled and set.

When the stick holds in place, move the candy to the refrigerator for a final cooling. The candy will be totally cooled in about 10-15 minutes. Remove the candy from the refrigerator and gently pop the candy from the mold. VOILA…you’ve made a Lollipop.

To decorate the lollipop:
Melt white chocolate or almond bark. Dip the lollipop into the chocolate. Then dip into some sprinkles and top with an edible pearl. Refrigerate until the chocolate is set.

You can use the melted chocolate like glue to attach the edible pearls or candy shapes. With a small artist’s paint brush just dap a bit of melted chocolate where you want to attach the candy and then hold the candy for a moment until the chocolate cools a bit.

Flavoring and Color:
For every flavor and color you will have to make a separate batch of candy syrup. You can cut this recipe in half which will make a small amount. But you’ll have to use a very small pot to heat the syrup and you must make sure that the syrup is deep enough for the Candy Thermometer to accurately gauge the temperature.

AllRightsReserved@BigBlackDog

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