Tabbouleh, Taboolee or Tabouleh?

by Michelle on November 22, 2010

I grew up in Michigan and at the time the automobile industry was booming. And many immigrants, particularly Lebanese immigrants, moved to Michigan because they could immediately get a job with General Motors, Ford or Fisher Body. Consequently I grew up with many outside influences as far as religion and food. My Mom was not the common 1960’s cook, she canned every thing imaginable and nothing was ever from a box and she enjoyed experimenting with the family recipes of our neighbors. And dishes with odd sounding names like kibbee, mlookheeyeh and fasoolia were common at our family dinner table. Now that I look back, I was very fortunate to have had such experiences as a child.

On a side note, if anyone knows what this “grilled sandwich” is below, I would love to know!

Many of my friends attended Our Lady of Lebanon Maronite Catholic Church and every July the Church hosted the best Mid East Festival ever! The Mid East Festival was a huge event in Flint and everyone, including me, attended. So much fun with all the music, belly dancing, food and Arak! That Arak can really creep up on you, if you’re not careful! And the church ladies went out of their way to make the best food! Of course everything was from scratch and made the proper way..you know how those church ladies are, especially the kitchen church ladies!

I know this probably seems like a strange recipe to post during Thanksgiving week but trust me, nothing, absolutely nothing tastes better after a huge Thanksgiving feast and three days of turkey leftovers then a big bowl of Tabbouleh Salad.

Tabbouleh Salad
Recipe adapted from the Kitchen Ladies of Our Lady of Lebanon Maronite Catholic Church

1 c. cracked wheat (You can use Bulgar Wheat)
water
1 bunch green onions
4 large bunches parsley
1/2 bunch mint (about 1/2 c. fresh mint leaves)
4 large tomatoes
Juice of 4 lemons (I use the juice of 2 lemons)
1/2 c. olive oil (You can add more if needed)
Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

Optional: 4-5 cloves of garlic, minced (I know the church ladies would probably slap me silly, but I always add garlic to my Taboulee!)

1. Put the cracked wheat in a sieve and rinse thoroughly. Put the wheat in a small bowl and cover with water. Let soak until wheat become soft. Squeeze dry by pressing between palms.
2. Finely chop onions, including tops.
3. Finely mince parsley and mint. Discard the stems.
4. Dice tomatoes into very small pieces.
5. Combine wheat, onions, parsley, mint and tomatoes and toss thoroughly.
6. Blend lemon juice, oil, salt, pepper and garlic and pour over salad.
7. Serve and Enjoy! Serves 6.

The Oxo Herb Mincer makes short work of mincing all the parsley for this recipe. Please check out my “Gadgets that Work” below for addition information.



Gadgets that Work

Oxo Good Grips Herb Mincer

I love my Oxo Good Grips Herb Mincer. When I first bought it I did not have high hopes. It seems like such a simple concept yet I hadn’t heard about it before. But after using it for the first time, I knew it was going to be a most used gadget in my kitchen.

The Herb Mincer has 4 stainless steel circular blades and all you need to do is lay out your herbs and run the Mincer back and forth over the herbs and your mincing is done in seconds. It fits my hand very comfortably and snaps a part for easy cleaning. The Herb Mincer is dishwasher safe and does come with a handy removable cover to protect the blades for storage.

Although there are no restrictions on the use the Oxo Good Grips Herb Mincer, I highly recommend using it on a wooden cutting board, not only will the blades stay sharp longer, the herbs will have a nice, clean cut when minced.

AllRightsReserved@BigBlackDog

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Comments

  • Carolyn from Oz November 22, 2010 at 4:41 am

    That fried sandwich looks a bit like another version of turkish gozleme, I did an adaption after seeing it being sold at a Market when I was away recently in Melbourne. On Youtube there are various different ways of folding the bread and the fillings can vary also.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvufdpu3N7U

    There is an italian variation of something that looks similar called calzone

  • Noelle November 22, 2010 at 7:20 am

    This is ONE of my FAV salads ever. So delicious and truly healthy!

  • Sheila November 22, 2010 at 7:58 am

    Believe it or not, in my small town in the Deep South, we had a lot of Lebanese immigrants, and I can remember eating these dishes as a child, too. I was a picky eater, but I would eat anything the grandmother of a friend of mine would make. I think that’s one reason why I love eating them so much today. Just delicious, and your recipe sounds great. Thanks, Michelle!

    XO,

    Sheila :-)

  • teresa November 22, 2010 at 1:35 pm

    what a fun festival, i’ve never experienced anything like that. the salad looks amazing, and i’m going to keep my eyes open for one of those herb rollers!

  • tasteofbeirut November 22, 2010 at 11:37 pm

    Michelle
    these sandwiches are called man’ooshe and are a daily food in Lebanon, people eat them for breakfast, lunch, whenever. the way they are prepared on this photo is on a saaj, which is traditional and the best way because it does not fry the zaatar (herb mix) and keeps its nutritional value intact. The zaatar man’ooshe are offered in Lebanon with an optional filling of fresh tomatoes, cucumbers and fresh mint leaves.
    I am very interested in that herb mincer; I mince the parsley by hand, but would love a little helper!

  • Barbara @ Modern Comfort Food November 23, 2010 at 8:26 am

    How lucky you were to grow up with those sort of diverse foodie experiences when you were young. Tabbouleh wasn’t anywhere on the radar screen of the Florida seaside town where I grew up; instead we were obsessed with the delicious dishes of our Greek- and Cuban-American neighbors and did our best to try to duplicate them. That said, I’m totally on board with tabbouleh now, have all of the fresh ingredients for it in my garden now, and will definitely follow your lead here in lightening up after this week’s T-Day (over)indulgences. Love this recipe!

  • Danielle November 24, 2010 at 12:03 am

    One of my close friends and family is Lebanese. My daughter practically grew up at their house as much as our own. She loves tabbouleh but I’ve never made it. Thanks for the recipe.

  • Lisa@Pickles and Cheese November 30, 2010 at 12:22 pm

    I love Tabouleh and your recipe looked so much like a good friend of mine’s from college that I sent her a link to your post. She also grew up in Flint and she reminded me that I had actually been inside that church your mentioned when I attended her wedding there 25 years ago!! When we were in college, she would make a big bowl of tabouleh and we would all just grab a fork and eat it straight out of the bowl. Delicious!! Thanks for posting your recipe. I will be making it soon!

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